400 Level Course Descriptions

Undergraduate

400 Level Courses (2021-2022)

Course Designators

Below are descriptions of courses with the following ‘designators’ (the 3 letter code in front of the course number):

Course Prefix Department
HIS Department of History
JHP Joint History and Political Science
(administered by Political Science Department, Room 3018, Sidney Smith Hall)
NMC Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
(administered by the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, 4 Bancroft Avenue)

NOTE: All courses shown on this page are accepted towards a History program. However, as shown above, they are not all administered by the Department of History.

Course Nomenclature

NOTE: All courses shown on this page are accepted towards a History program. However, as shown above, they are not all administered by the Department of History.

  • H1-F = "First Term"; the first term of the Fall/Winter Session (September - December)
  • H1-S = "Second Term"; the second term of the Fall/Winter Session (January - April)
  • Y1-Y = full session (September - April)
  • Students should note that courses designated as "...Y1F" or "...Y1S" in the Timetable are particulary demanding.

400-level HIS courses are two-hour seminars that deal with very specialized subjects ad are often closely connected to a professor’s research. Most have specific course pre-requisites and require extensive reading, research, writing, and seminar discussion, and in most you will have the opportunity to do a major research paper. All 400-level HIS courses have enrolment restrictions during the FIRST ROUND (must have completed 14 or more full courses, be enrolled in a HIS Major, Specialist or Joint Specialist program and have the appropriate Prerequisites). During the SECOND ROUND of enrolment, access to 400-level seminars is open to all 3rd and 4th year students with the appropriate Prerequisite.

IMPORTANT: Due to significant enrolment pressure on 4th year seminars, during the first round of enrolment, the Department of History reserves the right to REMOVE STUDENTS who enrol in more than the required number for program completion (Specialists – 2; Majors, Joint Specialists – 1) without consultation.

Students in 400-level seminars MUST ATTEND THE FIRST CLASS, or contact the professor to explain their absence. Failure to do so may result in the Department withdrawing the student from the seminar in order to “free up” space for other interested students. Additional 400-level seminars for the 2021-2022 Fall/Winter Session may be added at a later date. To fulfill History program requirements, students may also use 400- level courses offered by other Departments at the U of T that are designated as ‘Equivalent & Related Courses’.

The Department also offers a few joint undergraduate-graduate seminars. These are indicated in the course description. Undergraduate enrolment in joint seminars is restricted, and the expected level of performance is high.


HIS 401H1-S, L0101 The Cold War through its Archives

The course reviews the history of the Cold War in light of formerly secret archival documents. Examples include the US White House Tapes and Venona decrypts; massive declassification of records in the ex-Soviet bloc; and parallel developments in China, Cuba, and other Communist states. Archival discoveries have cast new light, not just on individual episodes (e.g., Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979) but on the origins, strategies, and driving forces of this 45-year conflict. The focus will be mainly on the superpowers and their alliance systems.

Prerequisite: HIS311Y1/HIS344H1/HIS344Y1/HIS377H1
Exclusion: HIS401Y1, HIS306H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: TBA
Seminar: Monday 10-12
Geographic Area: c

HIS 414H1-F, L0101 Down and Out in Medieval Europe

Explores the life conditions of individuals on the lower echelons of medieval society (the poor, servants, and apprentices, the exiled, prisoners, slaves, foreigners, and lepers). In parallel, we will discuss the various conceptions of poverty that prevailed in the Middle Ages. These objectives will allow us to glimpse the European Middle Ages from an unusual angle as well as reflect on important socio-economic and religious changes.

Recommended Preparation: A course on the Middle Ages in any discipline
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: I. Cochelin
Seminar: Tuesday 10-12
Geographic Area: c

HIS 422H1-F, L5101 Early Modern English Popular Culture, 1500-1800
(Joint undergraduate/graduate course – HIS422H1/HIS1416H)

Deals with issues of orality, literacy, gender, class, and social conflict through the components of popular, as opposed to elite, knowledge, and culture. Subjects of study include folklore, magic, religion, drink, sex, riot, and festivity in early modern England. Some background in medieval and/or early modern history or literature is highly recommended. Extensive work will be undertaken with primary sources.

Prerequisite: One of HIS101Y1/HIS109Y1/HIS220Y1/HIS243H1/HIS244H1/HIS368H1/HIS337H1/HIS349H1/HIS357Y1
Exclusion: HIS496H1 (Topics in History: Early Modern English Popular Culture, 1600-1800), offered in Summer 2018
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: J. Mori
Seminar: Thursday 5-7
Geographic Area: c
Temporal Requirement: ½ credit

HIS 423H1-F, L0101 Social History of Medicine in the 19th & 20th Centuries
(Joint undergraduate/graduate course – HIS423H1/HIS1269H)

Introduces students to current issues in the social history of medicine and some of the major developments in the modern history of the discipline. The format is class discussion based on themes covered in the course textbook, covering such topics as the history of the doctor-patient relationship, changes in physicians' social status, changing attitudes toward the body, and the evolution of various medical and surgical specialties including obstetrics and gynecology. (Joint undergraduate-graduate).

Textbook(s): Edward Shorter, Doctors and Their Patients: A Social History.

Tentative Course Requirements: A major historiographical research paper (60%), outline for research paper (25%), and participation (15%).

Exclusion: HIS423Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: E. Shorter
Seminar: Thursday 4-6
Geographic Area: c

HIS 433H1-S, L0101 Polish Jews Since the Partition of Poland
(Joint undergraduate/graduate course – HIS433H1/HIS1287H)

The course will explore the history of Polish Jews from the Partitions of Poland to the present, concentrating on the late 19th and first half of the 20th centuries. It will examine the state policies toward Jews of Austria, Prussia, Russia and Poland; the rise of Jewish political movements; the life of Jewish shtetls in Christian neighbourhoods; changes in the economic position and cultural development of Jewish communities in Poland; and the impact of communism on Jewish life. Materials are in English. Primary sources in translation as well as secondary sources representing diverse interpretation and points of view will be analyzed.

Prerequisite: HIS208Y1/HIS251Y1/permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: P. Wróbel
Seminar: Thursday 9-11
Geographic Area: c

HIS435H1-S, L0101 Themes in Toronto History

This course will examine aspects of Toronto’s history. It is not a general survey of Toronto history; instead, the course will normally revolve around a specific theme or group of themes. Specific themes vary by year, depending on the focus of the instructor. Strong emphasis will be placed on reading and research. The theme for 2022 will be power and the city.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: S. Mills
Seminar: Tuesday 3-5
Geographic Area: b

HIS437H1-F, L0101 Telling Lies About Hitler: Frauds and Famous Feuds Among German Historians

This course examines controversies that decisively influenced German historical thought and writing since 1890 and their public reception. The seminar combines two approaches. On the one hand it offers focused case studies drawn from scholarly and public debates. On the other hand it explores the historian’s obligation to evaluate conflicting judgments about history rather than repeat accepted truths.
A selection of topics may include the forged Hitler diaries, the David Irving trial, Daniel Goldhagen’s “eliminationist” thesis about German antisemitism, Wehrmacht complicity in the Holocaust, a German woman’s experience in Berlin in 1945, and retrospective films about East Germany. These case studies illustrate how historians of Germany have found ways to address non-scholarly audiences.
A History Department requirement (on the website) states: Students in 400-level seminars MUST ATTEND THE FIRST CLASS or contact the professor to explain their absence. Failure to do so may result in the Department withdrawing the student from the seminar in order to "free up" space for other interested students.

Required Reading will include some of the following: Robert Harris, Selling Hitler: The Story of the Hitler Diaries (2000); Richard J. Evans, Telling Lies about Hitler: The Holocaust, Hitler, and the David Irving Trial (2002); Anonymous, A Woman in Berlin. Eight Weeks in the Conquered City: A Diary (Engl. ed. 2006); together with commentaries, reviews, videos, and associated materials on the Internet.

Course Requirements: 1 or 2 short oral reports on assigned readings; 1 preliminary essay bibliography (not graded); 1 book report (5 typed pages); 1 historiographical essay of approximately 15 double-spaced typed pages; regular attendance at (and participation in) class discussions.

Prerequisite: HIS317H1/HIS330H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: J. Retallack
Seminar: Monday 11-1
Geographic Area: c

HIS443H1-S, L0101 Society, Culture and Religion in the Renaissance and Reformation

Early moderns communicated with themselves, others, and God in ways that are often foreign to us, about concerns which we may not necessarily share, and working with assumptions that may be lost to us. In this course we will work with a range of primary sources (drama, ritual, diaries, letters, travel literature, treatises, dialogues, and official pronouncements) to understand the fears, hopes, and beliefs of early modern people, and their ways of communicating these. People of the time had a growing fascination with measurement, order, and rationality, and they took these as the best ways of reforming politics, religion, and life. We will look in particular at how reform movements generated mass expulsions and exiles and created the modern phenomenon of the religious refugee. We will also see how European Christians used religion and race as lenses through which they sought to understand non-Christian groups like Jews, Muslims, and Aboriginals.

Course Requirements: seminar participation, class facilitation, review of on-line research tool, one major research paper.

Prerequisite: HIS309H1/HIS357Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: N. Terpstra
Seminar: Monday 3-5
Geographic Area: c

HIS 446H1-S, L0101 Gender & Slavery in the Atlantic World
(Joint undergraduate/graduate course – HIS446H1/HIS1555H1)

The course examines the relationship between gender and the experience of slavery and emancipating several Atlantic world societies from the 17th-19th centuries. Areas to be covered are the Caribbean, Brazil, the U.S. South, West and South Africa and Western Europe.

Prerequisite: HIS291H1/HIS294Y1/HIS230H1,231H1/HIS295Y1
Exclusion: HIS446Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: M. Newton
Seminar: Thursday 10-12
Geographic Area: a/b/c

HIS 451H1-F, L0101 World War II in East Central Europe

World War II was much more destructive and traumatic in East Central Europe than in Western Europe. The difference was caused by many reasons, among which the Nazi and Soviet plans and policies were the most important. Yet, there were also numerous East Central European phenomena that contributed to the cruelty of World War II in the East. This seminar will explore the external and internal factors that defined the war in the discussed region. Students will analyze the military, political, economic, and cultural activities of Germany, the Soviet Union, and their allies and enemies. Following sessions will concentrate on the fall of the Versailles systems, diplomatic and military activities throughout the war, on occupational policies of the invaders, economic exploration of the invaded, on collaboration, accommodation, resistance, genocide, the “liberation” and sovietisation of East Central Europe after 1944. All the secondary and primary sources used in class are English.

Prerequisite: EUR200Y1/HIS251Y1/HIS334H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: TBA
Seminar: Thursday 9-11
Geographic Area: c

HIS 465Y1-Y, L0101 Gender and International Relations
(Joint undergraduate/graduate course HIS465Y1/HIS1533H1)

This seminar explores the use of gender as a category of analysis in the study of international relations. Topics include gendered imagery and language in foreign policymaking; beliefs about women’s relationship to war and peace; issues of gender, sexuality, and the military; gender and global governance; gender and the global economy; sexual violence; and contributions of feminist theory to international relations theory.

Exclusion: JHP440Y1
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 credit at the 300-level in HIS/POL/WGS
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

Instructor: C. Chin
Seminar: Monday 4-6
Geographic Area: c

HIS 466H1-F, L0101 Topics in Canadian History: Commemorations and Public History, Canada, 1800-2000

This course explores selected topics in the history of commemoration, public memory, and public history in Canada. We will examine the number of different locations in Canadian society in which historical memories have been created and disseminated. Covering a time span from, roughly, the early nineteenth century up to the present, we will examine how the past has been remembered. Such processes have often involved various groups - political, economic, and social elites - who have attempted to create ‘pasts’ or ‘traditions’ for themselves and others in society, often as part of creating socio-economic and political hegemony. The course will look at institutions and processes, such as the state or tourism, as examples of such developments. However, we will also read about their contestation; the attempts by women, working-class people, and ethnic and racialized groups to counter the powerful’s apparent monopoly on the public memory of the past. We also will explore the multiple ways in which historical memories have shaped and created landscapes, in ways both discursive and material.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/HIS264H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: C. Morgan
Seminar: Tuesday 1-3
Geographic Area: b

HIS 466H1-S, L0101 Topics in Canadian History: Upper Canada Creating a Settler Society, 1790s-1860s

This course explores selected topics in the history of Upper Canada, such as its formation in the crucible of transatlantic and imperial warfare, relationships with Indigenous people, the creation of multiple institutions, and colonial leisure and culture. As well as having its own particular local characteristics and features, not least its proximity to the United States, Upper Canada was one of a number of settler societies within the British Empire. The course is intended to explore various dimensions of these aspects and, wherever possible, to consider the relationships between local dynamics and imperial currents. Although the colony became ‘Canada West’ in 1841, our readings and discussions will stretch beyond that conventional political boundary, moving us into the 1850s and 1860s.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/HIS264H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: C. Morgan
Seminar: Tuesday 1-3
Geographic Area: b/c

HIS 467H1-F, L0101 French Colonial Indochina: History, Cultures, Texts, Film

This course examines French colonial Indochina through a number of different lenses. Early attention will be afforded to the cross-cultural “contact zones” between colonial and colonized societies. Other issues that will be stressed include contested geographies, the characteristics of a settler society, imperial cultures, expressions of colonial power, and forms of opposition and resistance. A number of primary sources will serve as fruitful artefacts to be analysed in class: colonial novels, recently translated resistance literature, documentaries, and feature films. The net result will be to underscore the many tensions of colonialism. Finally, we will turn to a series of wistful and nostalgic recent filmic representations of French colonial Indochina, films described as “Indochic” by literary critic Panivong Norindr. By sifting through these phantasmatic memories of Indochina, and contrasting them with a number of case studies, this course will illuminate issues that go well beyond the boundaries of former Indochine – issues of contested memory, identity, and resistance.

Prerequisite: ANT344Y1/EAS204Y1/GGR342H1/HIS104Y1/HIS107Y1/HIS280Y1/HIS283Y1/HIS284Y1/HIS315H1/HIS388H1/NEW369Y1
Exclusion: HIS467Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: E. Jennings
Seminar: Tuesday 10-12
Geographic Area: a/c

HIS 475H1-F, L0101 Senior Thesis Seminar

History Specialists only. Compulsory for all Specialists undertaking a one-semester dissertation. Weekly seminars provide training in reviewing literature, writing research proposals, formulating hypotheses, oral presentation of findings and constructive critique of other students work. Posters will be prepared for an annual spring conference. Students must find topics and thesis supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Students registered in HIS475H1 are under the obligation of attending the weekly senior thesis seminar scheduled on Tuesday from 10-12 in the Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room (SS 2098). Students selecting the Senior Thesis option must have a B+ average in no less than 4.0 HIS courses.

How to Enrol:

  • Complete the HIS475H1F SeniorThesisBallot-2020.pdf (Senior Thesis) with the help of your proposed supervisor. Attach a one-page outline of the project you wish to undertake and a copy of your transcript. Ensure that your supervisor signs the form.
  • Return the documents to the Department The deadline for applications is August 16th, 2021 for the Fall-Winter 2021-2022 academic year.
  • If approved, your study course will be added to your record on ROSI by the Department of History. If it is not approved, we will notify you and your proposed supervisor as soon as possible by email.

For further information, students may contact the Associate Chair, Undergraduate.

Prerequisite: Consent of supervisor and department
Exclusion: HIS498H1, HIS499Y1, HIS476Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: S. Hawkins
Seminar: Tuesday 10-12

HIS 476H1-S, L0101 Senior Thesis Seminar

History Specialists only. Compulsory for all Specialists undertaking a one-semester dissertation. Weekly seminars provide training in reviewing literature, writing research proposals, formulating hypotheses, oral presentation of findings and constructive critique of other students work. Posters will be prepared for an annual spring conference. Students must find topics and thesis supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Students registered in HIS 476H1 are under the obligation of attending the weekly senior thesis seminar scheduled 2.0 hours/week Asynchronous. Students selecting the Senior Thesis option must have a B+ average in no less than 4.0 HIS courses.

How to Enrol:

  • Complete the HIS476H1S SeniorThesisBallot-2021.pdf (Senior Thesis) with the help of your proposed supervisor. Attach a one-page outline of the project you wish to undertake and a copy of your transcript. Ensure that your supervisor signs the form.
  • Return the documents to the Department by the deadline for applications is August 16th, 2021 for the Fall-Winter 2021-2022 academic year.
  • If approved, your study course will be added to your record on ROSI by the Department of History. If it is not approved, we will notify you and your proposed supervisor as soon as possible by email.

For further information, students may contact the Associate Chair, Undergraduate.

Prerequisite: HIS475H1 and consent of supervisor and department
Exclusion: HIS476Y1, HIS498H1, HIS499Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: TBA
Seminar: 2.0 hours/week

HIS 477H1-F, L0101 Topics in the Social and Cultural History of Victorian Britain

This course examines the impact of industrialism and Victorian society and values.  Readings will concentrate on major works by Victorian social critics, including Engels, Mayhew, Arnold, Dickens, and Morris.

Recommended Preparation: A course in modern British History/Victorian literature
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: L. Loeb
Seminar: Tuesday 4-6
Geographic Area: c

HIS 484H1-F, L0101 The Car in North American History

This seminar examines the history of the car in North America from the perspective of technology, business, landscape, and popular culture. Particular attention is paid to issues of production, consumption, geography, and daily life, and to the importance of class race, gender, region, and age in shaping the meaning and experience of car culture.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/HIS264H1/HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: D. Anastakis
Seminar: Tuesday 11-1
Geographic Area: b

HIS 490H1-S, L0101 Everyday Stalinism

This course is an advanced research seminar in Soviet history. It will explore issues of everyday life in Soviet Russia during the Stalin era. What was the "Soviet normal"? Was there such a thing? How did people live in and outside the Gulag? Students will be introduced to major topics through the use of a series of different types of sources. During the first eight weeks of the seminar, students will read intensively, acquiring familiarity with various sources and their specific problems in Soviet history; at the same time, they will design a topic and bibliography for their research paper. The remainder of the course will be devoted to individualized research.

Recommended Preparation: Any course in Russian history, culture, or politics
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: L. Viola
Seminar: Tuesday 3-5
Geographic Area: c

HIS 496H1-F, L0101 Topics in History: Trends in Women and Gender History in the Global South

This seminar is intended as an introduction to key issues, debates, and themes in the historiography of women and gender in the global south. The course focuses on the intersections of gender, sexuality, nationalism and transnationalism in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean within the context of colonialism, decolonization, and globalization from the late 19th century to the early 21st century. Case studies range from gender and tradition in colonial and nationalist discourses; nationalist leaders and women’s emancipation; body politics; sexuality, the state and citizenship to feminism, nationalism, and transnationalism.
The seminar asks not only questions of gendered and sexual inclusive and exclusive discourses and practices; it also considers questions of what history is and how it is constructed.
The seminar will be a space for intellectual exploration and learning, for the forming and sharpening of ideas, and for discovery about some of the ways women and gender historians have been making histories, working in a variety of fields and archives, defining and theorizing problems and using evidence-based research.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits.
Exclusion: Students may not take both L0601 ("Critical Histories of the Black Canadian Experience") and L0701 ("Race in Canada") offered in 2016-17 Fall/Winter.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Instructor: N. Musisi
Seminar: Tuesday 4-6
Geographic Area: a

HIS 496H1-S, L0101 Topics in History: Religion and Society in Southeast Asia
(Joint undergraduate/graduate course HIS496H1/HIS1664H1)

This course introduces students to major debates on the concept of “religion” and "world religion" in Southeast Asia, and the relationship between these constructs and the lived experiences of the inhabitancies of the region. Each week, students will read one or two theoretical pieces that set the stage discussion and one empirical study from the region. This is not a comprehensive review of the literature on religious practice in Southeast Asia, but rather, a critical inquiry about how the use of “religion," and especially, "world religion" as conceptual categories have shaped academics and political actors locally and globally have represented the habits, practices, and sensibilities of the people who live(d) in these places.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits.
Exclusion: Students may not take both L0601 ("Critical Histories of the Black Canadian Experience") and L0701 ("Race in Canada") offered in 2016-17 Fall/Winter.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Instructor: N. Tran
Seminar: Monday 2-4
Geographic Area: a

HIS496H1-S, L0201 Topics in History: Renaissance Humanism

The seminar will discuss Renaissance Humanism in its various forms, applications, and contexts. Every student will be responsible for a seminar presentation on a subject of his or her choice but guided by the topics and the schedule in the course outline. You can focus on Italy or any place north of the Alps and any time period between about 1350 and 1600. Please review the various topics in advance of the first meeting so that you can choose a time and topic for your seminar.
For the seminar, you will be responsible for providing the other students in the class some suggestions for reading (both primary and secondary materials) at least one week in advance to stimulate the discussion of your presentation. I expect every seminar will be an active, dynamic dialogue in the best Humanist tradition. Rather than reading verbatim a prepared paper, be provocative in order to engage the rest of the class. The use of visual material is encouraged.
A written research paper based on your seminar presentation is due at the end of term. Do take into consideration my and the other students’ responses to your presentation and do discuss your topic and bibliography with me in advance.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits.
Exclusion: Students may not take both L0601 ("Critical Histories of the Black Canadian Experience") and L0701 ("Race in Canada") offered in 2016-17 Fall/Winter.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Instructor: K. Bartlett
Seminar: Monday 3-5
Geographic Area: c

HIS 496H1-S, L0301 Topics in History: Hacking History

This year-long course examines the relationships among academic history, digital media, and community formation using a variety of texts and methods; it culminates in an intensive semester-long digital storytelling project focused on community engagement. The intellectual focus of the first semester is two-fold: first, on the history of the public sphere and second, on the politics of “engaged” scholarship. At the same time, students will be exposed to techniques of multimedia and nonlinear storytelling. The second semester revolves around a group project undertaken in concert with a community organization. Working closely with their community partners, students will build a digital archive or storytelling framework using multimedia and/or social networking technologies. The fundamental aim of the course is to expand the reach of historical scholarship outside of the academy, and to develop modes of historical research compatible with community engagement.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits; HIS393H1, equivalent experience, or instructor's permission
Recommended Preparation: Basic HTML/CSS skills as learned in self-paced online introductions
Exclusion: HIS455Y1 (Hacking History)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Instructor: M. Price
Seminar: Wednesday 2-4

HIS 496H1-S, L0401 Topics in History: Race in the USA and Canada
(Joint undergraduate/graduate course HIS496H1/HIS1180H)

Explores historical contexts of public health and racialization that offer perspective on societal response to the COVID19 pandemic in Canada and the United States. Readings examine power and inequality during national and global crises, conceptions of public health and disease, foreign relations’ impacts, media, racism, intersections among race, gender, sexuality, class, and religion, disinformation, and struggles for an inclusive society. Each student will pursue a research essay topic of their choice.
An in-depth examination of historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including 2.0 HIS credits.
Exclusion: Students may not take both L0601 ("Critical Histories of the Black Canadian Experience") and L0701 ("Race in Canada") offered in 2016-17 Fall/Winter.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Instructor: L. Mar
Seminar: Thursday 10-12
Geographic Area: b

HIS 498H1-F/S/499Y1-Y Independent Studies Courses

History Majors only. The Department of History offers senior undergraduate students the possibility of study under the course designations HIS498H1-F/S or HIS499Y1-Y. These courses result in the production of an independent research project. This may not necessarily take the form of a thesis. Students must find topics and project supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Independent studies are for students who wish to pursue a detailed research project. This usually involves the preparation of a major paper, though it may take other forms, and must be done under the supervision of an eligible History faculty member. (Please note that faculty are under no obligation to supervise I.S. projects). Students wishing to enrol in these courses must be enrolled in a History Major program, with a B+ average in no less than 4.0 HIS courses or obtain special permission of the instructor. Students must attend the senior thesis seminar which is scheduled on Tuesdays from 10-12 in the Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room (SS 2098).
Note:

  • It is not practical to do an I.S. as a full-credit taken in one term (i.e. HIS499Y1-F or 499Y1-S)
  • Students are allowed only 1.0 I.S. course in History
  • Where research projects can be undertaken within the scope of an existing HIS seminar, students will not normally be allowed to enroll in Independent Studies.

How to enrol:

  • Complete the HIS 498H-499Y Registration Form.pdf (Independent Study with the help of your proposed supervisor. Attach a one-page outline of the project you wish to undertake and a copy of your transcript. Ensure that your supervisor signs the form.
  • Return the documents to the Department by August 16 for Fall/Winter 2021-22 academic year.
  • If approved, your study course will be added to your record on ROSI by the Department of History. If it is not approved, we will notify you and your proposed supervisor as soon as possible by email.

For further information, students may contact the Associate Chair, Undergraduate.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities