Summer Course Descriptions

Undergraduate

Summer Course Descriptions - 2021

The Department offers 100-level, 200-level, 300-level, and 400-level History (HIS) courses.

PLEASE NOTE

  • Course descriptions are not final and may be changed at or before the first class.
  • For enrolment instructions, students should consult the Faculty of Arts & Science 2021 Summer Preliminary Timetable.
  • Prerequisites will be enforced rigorously. Students who do not have the relevant prerequisite(s) may be removed from the course after classes begin. Specific questions regarding prerequisites for a course can be answered by the course instructor. Where there are two instructors of a course, an asterisk (*) indicates the Course Coordinator.

**This page will be updated regularly. Please check here for curriculum changes.


Course Nomenclature

  • Y1-Y is a full course, both terms.
  • Y1-F is a full course, first term (fall session)
  • Y1-S is a full course, second term (winter session)
  • H1-F is a half course, first term (fall session)
  • H1-S is a half course, second term (winter session)

100 Level Courses

100-level HIS courses are designed for students entering university. They take a broad sweep of material, and introduce students to the methods and techniques of university study. Each week, students will attend two lectures given by the course professor, and participate in one tutorial led by a teaching assistant. First year courses are not considered to be in an ‘area’ for program requirements.

All 100-series HIS courses are mutually exclusive, with the exception of AP, IB, CAPE, or GCE transfer credits.  Students may enrol in only one 100-series History course.  Students enrolled in more than one of these courses (or who have completed one of these courses or a previous HIS 100-series course with a mark of 50% or greater) will be removed at any time.  First-Year students can also enrol in 200-series HIS courses. ALL students enrolled in a History Specialist, Major, or Minor program must take ONE 100-level HIS course.

HIS 102Y1-Y Empires, Encounters, and Exchanges 

Interactions among peoples, empires, and cultures, with particular attention to the non-European world. Can we speak of “international relations” before the modern concept of nation-states was established? What forms did globalization take in the Temporal era? Covering a broad chronological sweep we will look at exchanges of goods and technologies; dissemination of ideas and religions; voyages of migration and exploration; and episodes of conquest and colonization.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1, HISA04H3/HISA05H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2); Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: M. Inan
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 5-7
Tutorials: Monday 7-8; Wednesday 4-5; Wednesday 7-8
Temporal: ½ credit

200 Level Courses

200-Level HIS courses are surveys that introduce in broad outlines the history of a particular country, region, continent, or theme. Most are essential background for further upper-level study in the area. Students will generally attend two lectures and participate in one tutorial each week. The 200-level courses are open to first year students as well as those in higher years.

The Department regularly offers a number of HIS 299Y Research Opportunity Programs, which are open only to students in their second year. In this course, your work as a Research Assistant to a professor on a particular subject. In past years, students in HIS 299Y courses have done oral history interviews, sought out manuscripts in provincial archives, and gathered primary source documents in the university libraries. Students in their first year should check with the Faculty Registrar in February for the list of ROPs that will be offered in the following academic year.

HIS 218H1-F Environmental History

A lecture-based course designed to introduce students to key moments and concepts in the field of environmental history since c. 1400. This course will track the reciprocal influence of humans and the non-human world since the so-called "Columbian Exchange," emphasizing the ways in which the non-human world-from plants, animals, and disease organisms to water, topography, and geography- have shaped human endeavours. At the same time, students will engage with many of the ways in which human beings have shaped the world around us, from empire and colonization, to industrial capitalism, nuclear power, and modern wildlife conservation.

Prerequisite: any 100-level History course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: R. Woods
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 1-3
Tutorials: Tuesday 12-1; Thursday 3-4
Geographical Area: --

HIS241H1-S Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1914

This course gives an introduction to major themes in European history over the ‘long’ nineteenth century. The geographical focus will be on the countries of Western Continental Europe, especially France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy, though at times developments in Great Britain and Russia will be discussed; the themes covered will be quite wide ranging. Political developments to be covered include the establishment of Restoration Europe, the revolutions of 1848, the unifications of Italy and Germany, imperialism and the coming of the First World War. We will also discuss industrialization and its manifold effects, a variety of intellectual and social movements, and changes in cultural life over the course of the century. The course explores the history of everyday life as well as the history of high politics and culture, and emphasizes the importance of multiple approaches to historical problems. Attendance at lectures, tutorial participation, reading, research, and writing are all essential components of this course. In the tutorials, students will discuss a variety of primary sources, including novels, essays, and public speeches. Students will also work closely with tutors on the preparation of essays.

Exclusion: EUR200Y1/EUR200Y5/FGI200Y5/HIS241H5/HISB93H3
Recommended Preparation: HIS103Y1/HIS109Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: N. Rahal
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 5-7
Tutorials: Tuesday 7-8; Thursday 4-5; Thursday 7-8
Geographical Area: III

HIS 264H1-F Critical Issues in Canadian History

This course introduces the history of Canada through an exploration of key themes and methods. It will cover several time periods, but it is not a standard survey that begins with New France and proceeds forward to next week. Rather, we will focus on some the key forces that shaped Canada over time. We will also study some of the important skills of historical research and writing. Possible topics include treaties with First Nations, immigration, empire and nationalism, welfare, and environment. All students are welcome, but a key aim of the course is to help prepare students for upper year Canadian History courses.

Exclusion: HIS262H1, HIS263Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: K. Main
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 5-7
Tutorials: Monday 7-8; Wednesday 4-5; Wednesday 7-8
Geographical Area: III

HIS 291H1-S Latin America: The Colonial Period

This course provides an introduction to the broad literature on Latin America’s rich colonial history. We will begin by tracing some of the early origins of – and points of contact between - the Indian, Iberian, and African men and women who formed the basis of colonial society. As the course progresses, we will explore the variety of ways in which colonial subjects lived, worked, ate, worshipped and socialized. Lectures and reading assignments will draw upon a variety of sources, including court cases, artistic renderings, city maps and street plans, travel accounts of visits to the region, and the material, cultural, and intellectual products made possible by the wealth and dynamism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Age of Revolutions, a period of dramatic upheaval that remains at the center of lively scholarly debates. By the end of the semester, you will be able to engage the key issues driving these debates, as well as to address one particularly enduring question: what is Latin America’s colonial legacy?

Exclusion: HIS291Y1/HIS290H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: V. Morales
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 3-5
Tutorials: Monday 5-6; Wednesday 2-3; Wednesday 5-6
Geographical Area: II
Temporal: ½ credit

300 Level Courses

300-Level HIS courses are more specialized and intensive. They deal with more closely defined periods or themes. They vary in format, with some being based around lectures, and others involving tutorial or discussion groups. Most 300-level courses have prerequisites, which are strictly enforced. First year students are not permitted to enrol in 300 or 400-level HIS courses. Although some upper level courses do not have specific prerequisites, courses at the 300- and 400-level are demanding and require a good comprehension of history.

HIS 330H1-S Germany from Frederick the Great to the First World War

This survey history of modern Germany begins by illuminating the unchanging rhythms of everyday life in Temporal Europe.  It ends in a very different age – when motorcars and trams rumbled through the streets of huge cities, when German battleships prowled the North Sea and Zeppelins hovered above Lake Constance, when Nobel Prize-winning scientists were the envy of the world, when Expressionism was exploding artistic conventions, and when new ideas about race and eugenics were emerging.
Did Otto von Bismarck’s invocation of “blood and iron” in 1862 epitomize Germany’s transition to modern times?  Or should we look to other developments to understand how the Germany of Goethe and Schiller became the Germany of Hitler and the Holocaust?  Several themes are highlighted: social conflict (and the search for community), confessional Geographical Area (and popular piety), regional diversity (and the “imagined nation”), the women’s movement (and patriarchal resistance), and political battles that contributed, paradoxically, to both polarization and stalemate. Taking up these contentious themes will allow students to engage critically with Germany’s fractured past.
Audio-visual materials and a 15-minute discussion period are featured in every class. We will view an East German film based on Heinrich Mann’s satire of Germans’ subject mentality under Kaiser Wilhelm II. And students will have access to a vast array of images and documents (in translation) on the website of the German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C.

Prerequisite: At least 1.0 FCE HIS course(s) at the 100 or 200 level
Exclusion: HIS341Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: E. Bredovskis
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 3-5
Geographical Area: III

HIS 342H1-F Political and Psychological Liberation in 20th Century Africa

This course examines the growth of movements for the political liberation of Africa and the psychological liberation of Africans from Western imperialism and cultural hegemony. Postcolonial thinking and art was fundamental to the project of decolonization. It uses primary text and films to explore African cultural and intellectual history.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: T. Bello
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 12-2
Geographical Area: I

HIS 377H1-S 20th Century American Foreign Relations

This course surveys the history of American foreign relations from World War I to the present. Themes of the course include the rise of the United States as a major power; the role of culture and ideology in international relations; and the implications of foreign policy for American national identity.

Exclusion: HIS377Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: M. Vallières
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 5-7
Geographical Area: II

HIS 385H1-F History of Hong Kong

This course examines the growth of Hong Kong from a trading port set up by the British Empire for their China trade in the mid-19th century, to the city’s rise as a major centre of the world economy and of the Chinese diaspora since the mid-20th century. It focuses on both Hong Kong’s internal developments and broader contexts.

Exclusion: Students cannot take both the Y and H version of HIS385
Recommended Preparation: HIS280Y1/JMC201Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: C. Lim
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 11-1
Geographical Area: I

HIS 389H1- F Topics in History: The Holocaust in Literature
(Joint undergraduate course HIS389H1/JGJ360H1)

This course has three interrelated goals. It aims to deepen your understanding of the Holocaust through examination of the literary works produced by its victims, in ghettos, camps, hiding, or under other circumstances, and in the immediate aftermath. It is designed to stimulate reflection on the uses, potential, and limits of literature – fiction, poetry, plays, films, and other creative forms – as means of engaging the unimaginable. It will encourage you to develop your analytical and creative skills and use them to think, write about, and discuss the Holocaust.
We will approach the topic through a combination of lectures, readings, discussion, films, written assignments, and participation in community events. The success of this intensive class depends on your preparation, attendance, and engagement.

Prerequisite: 9.0 FCEs including 1.0 FCE HIS course.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Instructor: Y. Wang
Lecture: Tuesday 10-1 & Thursday 10-12
Geographical Area: III

400 Level Courses

400-Level HIS courses are two-hour seminars that deal with very specialized subjects and are often closely connected to a professor's research. Most have specific course pre-requisites and require extensive reading, research, writing, and seminar discussion, and in most you will have the opportunity to do a major research paper. All 400-level HIS courses have enrolment restrictions during the FIRST ROUND (must have completed 14 or more full courses, be enrolled in a HIS Major, Specialist or Joint Specialist program and have the appropriate prerequisite). During the SECOND ROUND of enrolment, access to 400-level seminars is open to all 3rd and 4th year students with the appropriate prerequisite. IMPORTANT: Due to significant enrolment pressure on 4th year seminars, during the first round of enrolment, the Department of History reserves the right to REMOVE STUDENTS who enrol in more than the required number for program completion (Specialists – 2; Majors, Joint Specialists – 1) without consultation. First year students are not permitted to enrol in 300 or 400-level HIS courses.

Students in 400-level seminars MUST ATTEND THE FIRST CLASS, or contact the professor to explain their absence. Failure to do so may result in the Department withdrawing the student from the seminar in order to "free up" space for other interested students. Additional 400-level seminars for the 2014 Summer Session may be added at a later date. To fulfill History program requirements, students may also use 400- level courses offered by other Departments at the U of T that are designated as ‘Related Courses' or 'Equivalent Courses'.

HIS400H1-F The American War in Vietnam

This course examines the French and American Wars (1945-75) in Vietnam and its effects on the population of Vietnam and Southeast Asia. It begins with a brief overview of pre-colonial Vietnamese history and moves into a study of the impact and legacies of colonial rule and centres on the impact of the Wars on the cultures, economies, and societies of Southeast Asia.

Prerequisite: By permission of the Instructor
Exclusion: HIS315H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: N. Tran
Seminar: Tuesday & Thursday 2-4
Geographical Area: I