Summer Course Descriptions

Undergraduate

Summer Course Descriptions - 2022

The Department offers 100-level, 200-level, 300-level, and 400-level History (HIS) courses.

PLEASE NOTE

  • Course descriptions are not final and may be changed at or before the first class.
  • For enrolment instructions, students should consult the Faculty of Arts & Science 2022 Summer Timetable.
  • Prerequisites will be enforced rigorously. Students who do not have the relevant prerequisite(s) may be removed from the course after classes begin. Specific questions regarding prerequisites for a course can be answered by the course instructor. Where there are two instructors of a course, an asterisk (*) indicates the Course Coordinator.

**This page will be updated regularly. Please check here for curriculum changes.


Course Nomenclature

  • Y1-Y is a full course, both terms.
  • Y1-F is a full course, first term (fall session)
  • Y1-S is a full course, second term (winter session)
  • H1-F is a half course, first term (fall session)
  • H1-S is a half course, second term (winter session)

100 Level Courses

100-level HIS courses are designed for students entering university. They take a broad sweep of material, and introduce students to the methods and techniques of university study. Each week, students will attend two lectures given by the course professor, and participate in one tutorial led by a teaching assistant. First year courses are not considered to be in an ‘area’ for program requirements.

All 100-series HIS courses are mutually exclusive, with the exception of AP, IB, CAPE, or GCE transfer credits.  Students may enrol in only one 100-series History course.  Students enrolled in more than one of these courses (or who have completed one of these courses or a previous HIS 100-series course with a mark of 50% or greater) will be removed at any time.  First-Year students can also enrol in 200-series HIS courses. ALL students enrolled in a History Specialist, Major, or Minor program must take ONE 100-level HIS course.

HIS 102Y1-Y Empires, Encounters, and Exchanges 

Interactions among peoples, empires, and cultures, with particular attention to the non-European world. Can we speak of “international relations” before the modern concept of nation-states was established? What forms did globalization take in the Temporal era? Covering a broad chronological sweep we will look at exchanges of goods and technologies; dissemination of ideas and religions; voyages of migration and exploration; and episodes of conquest and colonization.

Exclusion: HIS100Y1, HIS101Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS106Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS108Y1, HIS109Y1, HIS110Y1, HISA04H3/HISA05H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2); Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: M. Price
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 5-7
Tutorials: Monday 7-8; Wednesday 4-5; Wednesday 7-8
Temporal: ½ credit

200 Level Courses

200-Level HIS courses are surveys that introduce in broad outlines the history of a particular country, region, continent, or theme. Most are essential background for further upper-level study in the area. Students will generally attend two lectures and participate in one tutorial each week. The 200-level courses are open to first year students as well as those in higher years.

HIS242H1-F Europe in the 20th Century

This course focuses on the political transformation of Europe from 1914 to the present day, and also surveys cultural, social, and economic developments. Lectures will cover an array of events and themes, from the two world wars, to the Russian Revolution, the rise and fall of fascism and the Third Reich, the Cold War, the collapse of communism, the building of new states, and the evolution of the European Union. Special attention will be paid throughout to themes relating to war, nationalism, and statecraft, and to key European leaders, including Mussolini, Hitler, Stalin, Franco, De Gaulle, Thatcher, Gorbachev, and Merkel.

Exclusion: EUR200Y1/EUR200Y5/FGI200Y5/HIS242H5/HISB94H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: J. Stollenwerk
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 1-3
Tutorials: Tuesday 3-4; Thursday 12-1; Thursday 3-4
Geographical Area: c

HIS 243H1-S Early Modern Europe, 1450-1648

Modern European society developed as a consequence of the dramatic changes which occurred in the period between the Renaissance and the end of the Thirty Years' War. The revival of classical ideas and principles revolutionized art and architecture, and provided new models for education, politics, law, science, and social organization. The religious movements within Christendom that divided Protestants and Catholics and set both against Jews and Muslims sent waves of refugees across Europe and globe and generated new ideas about how religion and politics combined. The Economic changes in Europe and Ottoman expansion in the Mediterranean sent European merchants, soldiers, and missionaries beyond the confines of the continent. As capitalism and colonialism combined, enslavement became a wider practice, generating more exclusionary ideas of race.  This course will follow these changes, with special attention given to the intellectual and cultural forces that motivated Europeans to undertake a fundamental re-evaluation of their ambitions and identities.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: L. Moncion
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 5-7
Tutorials: Tuesday 7-8; Thursday 4-5; Thursday 7-8
Geographical Area: c

HIS 264H1-F Critical Issues in Canadian History

This course introduces the history of Canada through an exploration of key themes and methods. It will cover several time periods, but it is not a standard survey that begins with New France and proceeds forward to next week. Rather, we will focus on some the key forces that shaped Canada over time. We will also study some of the important skills of historical research and writing. Possible topics include treaties with First Nations, immigration, empire and nationalism, welfare, and environment. All students are welcome, but a key aim of the course is to help prepare students for upper year Canadian History courses.

Exclusion: HIS262H1, HIS263Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: T. Blampied
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 5-7
Tutorials: Monday 7-8; Wednesday 4-5; Wednesday 7-8
Geographical Area: b

HIS 280Y1-Y History of China

A critical history of the place we today call China from prehistoric times to the 21st century, tracing shifting borders, identities, governments, and cultures while challenging any singular definition of "China."

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: J. Guo
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 5-7
Tutorials: Tuesday 7-8; Thursday 4-5; Thursday 7-8
Geographical Area: a
Temporal: ½ credit

300 Level Courses

300-Level HIS courses are more specialized and intensive. They deal with more closely defined periods or themes. They vary in format, with some being based around lectures, and others involving tutorial or discussion groups. Most 300-level courses have prerequisites, which are strictly enforced. First year students are not permitted to enrol in 300 or 400-level HIS courses. Although some upper level courses do not have specific prerequisites, courses at the 300- and 400-level are demanding and require a good comprehension of history.

HIS 342H1-S Political and Psychological Liberation in 20th Century Africa

This course examines the growth of movements for the political liberation of Africa and the psychological liberation of Africans from Western imperialism and cultural hegemony. Postcolonial thinking and art was fundamental to the project of decolonization. It uses primary text and films to explore African cultural and intellectual history.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: T. Bello
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 12-2
Geographical Area: a

HIS 377H1-F 20th Century American Foreign Relations

This course surveys the history of American foreign relations from World War I to the present. Themes of the course include the rise of the United States as a major power; the role of culture and ideology in international relations; and the implications of foreign policy for American national identity.

Exclusion: HIS377Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: K. Davis
Lecture: Tuesday & Thursday 5-7
Geographical Area: b

HIS 379H1-F Vietnam at War
(Joint undergraduate course HIS379H1/AMS313H1) 

Vietnam At War This course examines the French and American Wars in Vietnam, also known as the Indochina Wars, beginning with the Japanese surrender in 1945 through the capture of Saigon in 1975. We will consider the military, diplomatic, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of the conflict in its local contexts and with a global perspective in relation to the ongoing Cold War and geopolitical landscape.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in History, any field
Exclusion: HIS400H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

Instructor: N. Tran
Lecture: Monday & Wednesday 10-12
Geographical Area: a

HIS 389H1- F Topics in History: The Holocaust in Literature
(Joint undergraduate course HIS389H1/JGJ360H1)

This course has three interrelated goals. It aims to deepen your understanding of the Holocaust through examination of the literary works produced by its victims, in ghettos, camps, hiding, or under other circumstances, and in the immediate aftermath. It is designed to stimulate reflection on the uses, potential, and limits of literature – fiction, poetry, plays, films, and other creative forms – as means of engaging the unimaginable. It will encourage you to develop your analytical and creative skills and use them to think, write about, and discuss the Holocaust.
We will approach the topic through a combination of lectures, readings, discussion, films, written assignments, and participation in community events. The success of this intensive class depends on your preparation, attendance, and engagement.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits including 1.0 HIS credit
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

Instructor: D. Bergen/A. Shternshis
Lecture: Tuesday 10-1 & Thursday 10-12
Geographical Area: c

400 Level Courses

400-Level HIS courses are two-hour seminars that deal with very specialized subjects and are often closely connected to a professor's research. Most have specific course pre-requisites and require extensive reading, research, writing, and seminar discussion, and in most you will have the opportunity to do a major research paper. All 400-level HIS courses have enrolment restrictions during the FIRST ROUND (must have completed 14 or more full courses, be enrolled in a HIS Major, Specialist or Joint Specialist program and have the appropriate prerequisite). During the SECOND ROUND of enrolment, access to 400-level seminars is open to all 3rd and 4th year students with the appropriate prerequisite. IMPORTANT: Due to significant enrolment pressure on 4th year seminars, during the first round of enrolment, the Department of History reserves the right to REMOVE STUDENTS who enrol in more than the required number for program completion (Specialists – 2; Majors, Joint Specialists – 1) without consultation. First year students are not permitted to enrol in 300 or 400-level HIS courses.

Students in 400-level seminars MUST ATTEND THE FIRST CLASS, or contact the professor to explain their absence. Failure to do so may result in the Department withdrawing the student from the seminar in order to "free up" space for other interested students. Additional 400-level seminars for the 2022 Summer Session may be added at a later date. To fulfill History program requirements, students may also use 400- level courses offered by other Departments at the U of T that are designated as 'Equivalent Courses'.

HIS 406H1-F Advanced Topics in Gender History:  Constructions of Gender in East and Southeast Asia 

Scholars have long argued that women of Southeast Asia enjoy relative autonomy compared to their counterparts in East Asia and that such autonomy is a distinctive feature of the region. This seminar critically examines the presumptions about gender relations in East and Southeast Asia to explore how particular categories of “feminine” and “masculine” norms have been appropriated to represent the cultures of these two regions.
Although many of the topics are historical, students will read interdisciplinary readings that engage with theoretical questions important to feminist studies.  Themes to be explored include “culture” and its effects on gender categories; class and status and their influences on normative gender roles; the advent of modernity and its effects on constructs of gender in the respective spheres; and finally, the applicability of Western feminism to the women’s experiences in other parts of the world. 

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3) 

Instructor: N. Tran
Seminar: Monday & Wednesday 2-4
Geographical Area: a

HIS 499Y1-Y Independent Study Course

History Majors only. The Department of History offers senior undergraduate students the possibility of study under the course designations HIS498H1-F/S or HIS499Y1-Y. These courses result in the production of an independent research project. This may not necessarily take the form of a thesis. Students must find topics and project supervisors. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.
Independent studies are for students who wish to pursue a detailed research project. This usually involves the preparation of a major paper, though it may take other forms, and must be done under the supervision of an eligible History faculty member. (Please note that faculty are under no obligation to supervise I.S. projects). Students wishing to enrol in these courses must be enrolled in a History Major program, with a B+ average in no less than 4.0 HIS courses or obtain special permission of the instructor. 
Note:

  • It is not practical to do an I.S. as a full-credit taken in one term (i.e. HIS499Y1-F or 499Y1-S)
  • Students are allowed only 1.0 I.S. course in History
  • Where research projects can be undertaken within the scope of an existing HIS seminar, students will not normally be allowed to enroll in Independent Studies.

How to enrol:

  • Complete the Independent Study Ballot PDF iconHIS498H1-HIS499Y1_IndSt-Form-Summer_20225.pdf (with the help of your proposed supervisor). Attach a one-page outline of the project you wish to undertake and a copy of your transcript. Ensure that your supervisor signs the form.
  • Return the documents to the Department by April 15, 2022 for the Summer 2022 academic session.
  • If approved, your study course will be added to your record on ROSI by the Department of History. If it is not approved, we will notify you and your proposed supervisor as soon as possible by email.

For further information, students may contact the Associate Chair, Undergraduate.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities